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June 24, 2014

NetCarrier Announces Rollout of nCloud xStream


By Deepika Mala SIP Trunking Report Contributor



NetCarrier, a major provider of traditional, dynamic, and cloud-based voice and data services nationwide, recently introduced a business class broadband service, known as the nCloud xStream.

"This is an exciting day for our channel," said Bruce Wirt, vice president of nCloud Sales at NetCarrier.  "To date, the telecom distribution channel has only been eligible for commissions on a limited number of broadband products.  This product gives agents and VARs a commissionable alternative to the cable companies."


Company officials said that the new nCloud xStream service is capable of delivering speeds of up to 500 MB/sec and is available at retail prices starting at $169.95, including static IP addresses and managed equipment. 

NetCarrier's nCloud xStream service is deployed using a fiber optic backbone. Currently, it is available in 16 markets in the continental United States, including large cities like Philadelphia, Los Angeles, and New York.

Officials confirmed that nCloud xStream can be sold as Internet only, or can be bundled with NetCarrier's traditional voice or nCloud PBX products.

Furthermore, NetCarrier will offer two types of agreements to agents for xStream-one to master agents and other for smaller agents and VARs.

"Let me make it clear that I believe in the channel," said Wirt.  "In the seven years that I've led the NetCarrier sales department, we have purely been a channel based organization.  I do not employ a direct sales component, and we will continue to operate solely through our nationwide agents, master agents, and VARs.  Unlike many of our competitors, we will not be competing against our channel with this product; this is a tremendous opportunity for our partners."

With integrity, superior communication, custom solutions, and savings, NetCarrier constantly works towards exceeding the highest expectations of the most demanding buyer of telecommunications services.




Edited by Maurice Nagle